WikiLeaks republishes documents from Sony hacking scandal

WikiLeaks republished the Sony Entertainment data for the public domain Thursday from the North Korea hacking scandal last year through a Google-type search engine.

The database contains 30,000 documents and 173,000 emails between Sony Entertainment Pictures employees, clients, and collaborators. These documents and emails contain confidential opinions along with sensitive conversations.

“This archive shows the inner workings of an influential multinational corporation,” WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange said, “It is newsworthy and at the centre of a geo-political conflict. It belongs in the public domain.”

A group called the ‘Guardians of Peace’ leaked the information last November through peer-to-peer filesharing services on the Internet. The attack was later linked back to North Korea in retaliation to Seth Rogen and James Franco’s The Interview.

Although the motives behind the attack made many uneasy, it has brought important news stories to light, including the MPAA’s ongoing campaign against Google, otherwise known as Project Goliath.

The leaked information also includes ties between Sony and the Democratic Party. An email from the Democratic Party asked Sony Entertainment Pictures executives to donate $50,000 toward New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo for his anti-piracy work.

Sony Entertainment Pictures released a statement disagreeing with WikiLeaks’ decision and accused WikiLeaks of contributing to the malicious attack.

“We vehemently disagree with WikiLeaks’ assertion that this material belongs in the public domain and will continue to fight for the safety, security, and privacy of our company and its more than 6,000 employees,” a Sony spokesperson wrote in a statement.

“The attackers used the dissemination of stolen information to try to harm SPE and its employees, and now WikiLeaks regrettably is assisting them in that effort.”

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